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Tuesday, October 08, 2019

Kix - "Hot Wire" [Metal & X-Core]

Hot Wire

"Hot Wire" music video by Kix
Added: 08-10-2019
Genre : Metal & X-Core
Description : Kix - Hot Wire (Official Music Video)

You're watching the official music video for Kix - "Hot Wire" from the album 'Hot Wire' (1991)


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Hot Wire is the fifth studio album by the glam metal band Kix. It was released on July 9, 1991 on East West Records.

Hot Wire peaked at number 64 on the Billboard 200 in October 1991. It failed to match the sales of Kix's previous album, Blow My Fuse, selling slightly over 200,000 copies. Producer Taylor Rhodes co-wrote five of the song's ten albums with Donnie Purnell (the only Kix member credited as songwriter) while Crack the Sky member John Palumbo and songwriter Bob Halligan Jr. (Judas Priest, Kiss, Icon, Blue Öyster Cult) got two co-writing credits each.

Kix have had exactly one hit -- the power ballad "Don't Close Your Eyes," from their 1988 album Blow My Fuse. But to call it a power ballad is to imply that the band was no different from the rest of the hard rock/heavy metal bands debuting in the late '70s and early '80s. The truth is, they were different. Kix was different simply because they were much better -- they had better hooks, they rocked harder, and they could write songs. They were also more clever than the average heavy metal band, yet that never meant they treated their adolescent anthems as jokes; it meant that they loved the music they were making so much that their albums sounded like a constant party. Naturally, they were critics' favorites and never became big stars, even in heavy metal circles; when Metallica was all the rage during the '80s, Kix's good-time metal was seen as wimpy by most metal fans. However, Kix's albums hold up better than any of the pop metal bands that sold millions of records while they were struggling in the clubs.

Tags : 1991, 90s, Kix

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